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Immunizations

Immunization is when a person is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, usually by the administration of a vaccine.

A vaccine is a medical substance that works with a person’s immune system to protect against a specific disease. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) assures the safety and effectiveness of vaccines used in the United States, and only approves vaccines that are determined to be safe and effective.

For more information: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/default.htm

Childhood Vaccines

The best way to help protect children against serious illness is to ensure timely vaccinations by following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended schedule.

The recommended immunization schedule is designed to protect infants and children early in life by providing immunity when they are most at risk and before any possible exposure to life-threatening diseases. Delaying vaccines may put children at risk of becoming ill with vaccine-preventable diseases. The CDC has designed a catch-up schedule to quickly get children back on schedule if they fall behind.

Florida requires certain vaccines to be administered before children may enroll and attend childcare and school. Talk to your health care provider about vaccines for your child.

For more information: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/parent-ver-sch-0-6yrs.pdf

Adolescent Vaccines

Vaccines are not just for babies. Adolescents have different needs for immunizations. They are more social, so they are more likely to catch certain diseases. Also, protection from the immunizations they received as children can wear off over time, so an additional dose or booster is needed.

By giving the recommended immunizations in the adolescent years, they are protected when most at risk. Talk to your healthcare provider about vaccines for your adolescent and teen.

For more information: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/who/teens/downloads/parent-version-schedule-7-18yrs.pdf

Adult Vaccines

Adults need vaccines to help stay healthy, just like kids do. Even if you received all your vaccines as a child, the protection from some vaccines may wear off over time. You never outgrow the need for vaccines. The specific immunizations you need as an adult are determined by factors such as your age, lifestyle, high risk conditions, travel, and previous immunization history.

Talk to your health care provider to find out what vaccines may be right for you.

For more information: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-combined-schedule.pdf